ADVENTURE STUDIOS
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IMMERSE YOURSELF IN THE ADVENTURE
it can be a nightmare or a dream.

STAY TUNED EVERY MONDAY

Master F. Campanella 7 Dan.
Tae Action Center.
Brindisi ITALY.

Stano Match.

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Best Taekwondo Knockouts KO
Taekwondo VS Street Fighter (Real Fight)
360° VR VIDEO - Taekwondo Match in First Person | Battle Fight KO - VIRTUAL REALITY
Taekwondo (About this sound tʰɛk͈wondo (help·info); Hangul: 태권도; Hanja: 跆拳道; RR: Taegwondo) is a Korean martial art, characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques.
Taekwondo was developed during the 1940s and 1950s by various martial artists by incorporating elements of Karate and Chinese Martial Arts with indigenous Korean martial arts traditions such as Taekkyeon, Subak, and Gwonbeop.[1] The oldest governing body for taekwondo is the Korea Taekwondo Association (KTA), formed in 1959 through a collaborative effort by representatives from the nine original kwans, or martial arts schools, in Korea. The main international organizational bodies for taekwondo today are the International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF), founded by Choi Hong Hi in 1966, and the partnership of the Kukkiwon and World Taekwondo Federation (WTF), founded in 1972 and 1973 respectively by the Korea Taekwondo Association. Gyeorugi ([kjʌɾuɡi]), a type of full-contact sparring, has been an Olympic event since 2000. The body known for taekwondo in the Olympics is the World Taekwondo Federation.
World Taekwondo Federation

Official WTF trunk protector (hogu), forearm guards and shin guards
Under World Taekwondo Federation and Olympic rules, sparring is a full-contact event and takes place between two competitors in an area measuring 8 meters square.[38] A win can occur by points, or if one competitor is unable to continue (knockout).[39] Each match consists of three semi-continuous rounds of contact, with one minute rest between rounds. Competitors must wear a hogu, head protector, shin pads, foot socks, forearm guards, hand gloves, a mouthpiece, and a groin cup (males only). Many large tournaments sanctioned by national governing bodies or the WTF, including the Olympics, use electronic hogus, electronic foot socks, and electronic head protectors.
Points are awarded for permitted, accurate, and powerful techniques delivered to the legal scoring areas; light contact does not score any points. The only techniques allowed are kicks (delivering a strike using an area of the foot below the ankle) and punches (delivering a strike using the closed fist).[40] In most competitions, points are awarded by three corner judges using electronic scoring tallies. Several A-Class tournaments, however, are now experimenting with electronic scoring equipment contained within the competitors' body protectors. This limits corner judges to scoring only attacks to the head. Some believe that the new electronic scoring system will help to reduce controversy concerning judging decisions,[41] but this technology is still not universally accepted.[42]
Beginning in 2009, a kick or punch that makes contact with the opponent's hogu (the body guard that functions as a scoring target) scores one point. (The trunk protector is referred to as a momtong pohodae 몸통 보호대 or trunk guard in the WTF rules.) If a kick to the hogu involves a technique that includes fully turning the attacking competitor's body, so that the back is fully exposed to the targeted competitor during execution of the technique (spinning kick), three points are awarded. A kick to the head scores three points; as of October 2010 an additional point is awarded if a turning kick was used to execute this attack.[43] Punches to the head are not allowed. As of March 2010, no additional points are awarded for knocking down an opponent (beyond the normal points awarded for legal strikes).
The referee can give penalties at any time for rule-breaking, such as hitting an area not recognized as a target, usually the legs or neck. Penalties are divided into "Kyong-go" (warning penalty) and "Gam-jeom" (deduction penalty). Two "Kyong-go" are counted as an addition of one point for the opposing contestant. However, the final odd-numbered "Kyong-go" is not counted in the grand total.[44]
At the end of three rounds, the competitor with most points wins the match. In the event of a tie, a fourth "sudden death" overtime round, sometimes called a "Golden Point", is held to determine the winner after a one-minute rest period. In this round, the first competitor to score a point wins the match. If there is no score in the additional round, the winner is decided by superiority, as determined by the refereeing officials[43] or number of fouls committed during that round.