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On 16 October 1959, an agreement was concluded by the governments of the United Kingdom and the Federal Republic of Germany concerning the future care of the graves of German nationals who lost their lives in the United Kingdom during the two World Wars. The agreement provided for the transfer to a central cemetery in the United Kingdom of all graves which were not situated in cemeteries and plots of Commonwealth war graves maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in situ. Following this agreement, the German War Graves Commission (Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgraberfursorge) made arrangements to transfer the graves of German servicemen and civilian internees of both wars from scattered burial grounds to the new cemetery established at Cannock Chase. The inauguration and dedication of this cemetery, which contains almost 5,000 German and Austrian graves, took place in the presence of Dr. Trepte, the President of Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgraberfursorge, on the 10th June 1967. In the centre of the Hall of Honour, resting on a large block of stone, is a bronze sculpture of a fallen warrior, the work of the eminent German sculptor, Professor Hans Wimmer.
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Josiane Glover7 mons ago
All history should be remembered as a reminder of the devastation of war.
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may the world be peaceful forever,there are lots lots of graves
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Michaels_360_VR7 mons ago
@Cloyd McGlynn II The cemetery is for all of the German prisoners who died in captivity or were killed in action over British skies. Many of the WWI soldiers died on Spanish Influenza in 1918. There are also a couple of famous Nazi's buried here. One was killed by other German prisoners. What is nice is that the Zeppelin crews are buried together
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Gisselle Feeney7 mons ago
Pay tribute to the troops! The soldiers under the tombstone are national heroes!
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A German military cemetery in Britain? This makes me a little curious, maybe I should look up some relevant history.
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